Got Spider Milk?

Greetings Folks,

I’ve recently decided to start paying more attention to the Animal Kingdom. Random, I know. But since nature and everything in it is becoming obsolete, appreciating the Creator’s work is only right. So I’d like to share some very interesting information on a spider called Toxeus Magnus.

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The Toxeus Magnus is native to Southeastern Asia and is classified as a female jumping spider. This spider suckles its babies with fluid secreted from its own body that contains sugars, fats, and proteins; Biologist Rui-Chang Quan of the Chinese Academy of Science is calling it milk. Yes, you read it correctly. A spider is nursing its young with milk.

According to National Geographic, various types of spiders have been known to care for their offspring. Evolutionary Ecologist at McMaster University in Canada, Jonathan Pruitt, advised the following:

“Many female spiders will guard their egg cases and forgo eating while they do that.”

“Some spiders will open their egg cases and allow their offspring to ride around on their backs like [in] The Magic School Bus.”

Sciencemag.org stated that ongoing maternal care has largely been considered a uniquely mammalian trait. Like mammals, newly hatched spiderlings are entirely dependent on milk for their nutritional needs. After they are old enough to find their own food, spiderlings will continue to nurse on their mom’s milk for an additional 20 days. And the daughters are allowed to continue nursing after they reach sexual maturity.

In a strange yet humbling way, this information is shifting my perception of animals. They all have value, and us humans need to start realizing that. If you have any additional information on the Toxeus Magnus, feel free to comment below.

Until Next Time…

 

 

 

(Sources)

Goldman, J. G. (2018, November 29). Not just mammals: Some spiders nurse their young with milk. Retrieved February 28, 2019, from https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/2018/11/spiders-nurse-young-with-milk-lactation-arachnids/

Prolonged milk provisioning in a jumping spider. (2018, November 30). Retrieved February 28, 2019, from http://science.sciencemag.org/content/362/6418/1052

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