Color Blind or Blind To Reality?

Initially, I wasn’t going to address the topic of interracial relationships. But after seeing my community’s response to Dr. Umar Johnson’s Roland Martin interview, I would be doing a disservice if I didn’t finally get some things off my chest. Before I delve into my personal views on this topic, let’s go back in history and address how this conversation even came about.

Loving v. Virginia

  • In 1958, Mildred Jeter (black) and Richard Loving (white), Virginia residents, were married in The District of Columbia. When they returned to Virginia, the couple was charged with violating the states anti-miscegenation statute, which banned interracial marriages.
  • Both were sentenced to one year in jail, but the trial judge agreed to suspend the sentence if the Lovings agreed to leave Virginia and not return for 25 years.
  •  The court eventually came to a unanimous decision and “rejected the states argument that the statute was legitimate because it applied equally to both blacks and whites and found that racial classifications were not subject to a ‘rational purpose’ test under the Fourteenth Amendment.” The court also advised that the Virginia law violated the Due Process Clause of The Fourteenth Amendment.

This case anchored in generations of interracial marriages in the United States. So things should’ve changed for the better, especially after the Civil Rights Movement ended. Right?

Wrong

America still has a very ugly present with the black community in regards to race relations. And what I find offensively comical is this false narrative that’s currently being pushed in white liberal media, which states that interracial unions have been or will be the catalysts to end racism. The conversations that follow are even more disingenuous, egomaniacal, and condescending because the various groups who tell my community that we need to “get over race” not only benefit from the oppression of my ancestors, but they constantly remind me of my race on a daily basis.

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So, if love sees no color and we’re all the same, why is it that those who identify as African or descendants of Africans are still unlawfully mistreated by those who don’t? And I mean globally.

According to an article in News Week, West African migrants are being sold in modern-day slave markets in Libya. Survivors from the International Organization for Migration (IOM) advised that the trade is so commonplace that it takes place in public places. One Senegalese migrant stated that the men, who he described as Arab, sold him onto a makeshift prison, “held him without pay and forced him to work on meager rations; they regularly forced him to call his relatives at home to ask for ransom money.”

Another article in The Washington Post described the levels of racism towards Africans by the Chinese and Indians. A Congolese man, Masonda Ketanda Olivier, was confronted and beaten to death by a mob of Indian men in New Delhi last May; his friend advised that “it was a clear hate crime, with racial epithets repeatedly invoked.” And on that same day, a racist laundry detergent ad was released showing China’s blatant racism as well.

Oh, and let’s not forget to mention the trending assaults that are happening here in the United States towards blacks. But these are the same groups of people who I need to reach out to for love and affection, huh.

I don’t fault anyone in my community who does not support interracial relationships, especially when it’s used to smokescreen our history and our just due. The medium has been force-feeding this union down our throats for the past 5-10 years, in the midst of heightened racial tension, and I take it as nothing more than a spit in the face. Non-blacks are arrogantly telling me that the grass is so much greener on the other side and that every other group of women will be able to love me and help me heal better than a black woman. Self-hating blacks, who suffer from low self-esteem and Stockholm syndrome, build platforms bashing the black community and encourage us to “level up” by getting someone who doesn’t look like us;  because we’re at the bottom of the barrel anyway.

Allow me to send a direct message to those who are in black and non-black unions: SHUT UP. Neither one of you is in any position to speak on behalf of or to the black diaspora on how we should feel about this subject. Because you’re opinion, which holds the weight of wet toilet paper, isn’t rooted in anything historical or objective; it’s just an ego stroke for your biased, individual experience. Which you’re using to blind yourself from the reality that we live in. And if the machine that’s pushing this propaganda wasn’t working so diligently to downplay and destroy my union…

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I wouldn’t feel the way that I do about this.

Until Next Time…

 

 

 

(Sources)

Paton, C. (2017, April 11). AFRICAN MIGRANTS SMUGGLED INTO LIBYA SOLD AT ‘MODERN-DAY SLAVE MARKETS’. Retrieved August 8, 2017, from http://www.newsweek.com/african-migrants-smuggled-libya-sold-modern-day-slave-markets-582048

Tharoor, I. (2017, March 27). China and India have a huge problem with racism toward black people. Retrieved August 8, 2017, from https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/worldviews/wp/2016/05/27/china-and-india-have-a-huge-problem-with-racism-toward-black-people/?utm_term=.0ef7ed4e51b5jb

Loving v. Virginia. (n.d.). Retrieved August 8, 2017, from https://www.oyez.org/cases/1966/395

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